السلام علیکم Peace Be Upon You All1st time in Calgary AB Canada at Qadeemi Markazi Hussaini Association of Calgary(Main Shia Muslims Islamic Center located at #4755-34 Street SE Calgary AB) the City Of Calgary has permittedPublic Adhaan ( Call To Prayer ). We thank those who made this possible, Especially Councilor George Chahal, Minister Sawhany, and Mayor Naheed Nenshi. Unfortunately due to Covid-19 Guidelines we could not have a gathering, but we pray to Allah S.W.T to cure this rapidly spreading diseases and for the wellbeing of everyone.#ramadan2020 #cityofcalgary #adhan

Posted by Hussaini Association Of Calgary on Friday, May 8, 2020

السلام علیکم
Peace Be Upon You All

1st time in Calgary AB Canada at Qadeemi Markazi Hussaini Association of Calgary (Main Shia Muslims Islamic Centre located at 4755-34 Street SE Calgary AB) the City Of Calgary has permitted Public Adhaan ( Call To Prayer ).

We thank those who made this possible, Especially Councillor George Chahal, Minister Sawhany, and Mayor Naheed Nenshi.

Unfortunately due to Covid-19 Guidelines we could not have a gathering, but we pray to Allah S.W.T to cure this rapidly spreading diseases and for the well being of everyone.”

Alhumdulillah,

Physical Distancing being maintained at Darul-Uloom Masjid-Center during Salah and Taraweeh prayers due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

May Allah S.W.A. protect us all and forgive us all.

Ameen.


View this post on Instagram

***ANNOUNCEMENT*** Alhumdullilah, we are very happy to announce that efforts made by AMPAC and other community members has resulted in the City of Calgary also approving our request for masjids across Calgary to broadcast the Adhaan—the Muslim call to prayer—for the remaining days of Ramadan starting today, May 8, 2020. This approval is for the sunset or Maghrib prayer only. . The call to prayer does not invite people to physically gather; rather it is a beautiful gesture to bring our hearts together during this time of distancing. . Calgary now joins many mosques in Canada who have recently adopted the practice for the month of Ramadan for the sunset prayer only. We will be in touch with majids and organizations in Calgary. AMPAC has been designated as the main liaison between with the City of Calgary and the masjids for any Adhaan related items or updates. . AMPAC extends our deepest appreciation to the @cityofcalgary , City Council members, and most importantly, Mayor @nenshi for approving our request and understanding its importance to our community. This is a huge milestone and showcases the true beauty of our city, province, and country. . . . . . #ampac #albertamuslimpublicaffairscouncil #albertamuslims #yycmuslims #yyc #calgary #calgarymuslims #adhan #calltoprayer #alberta #acceptance #ramadan2020 #ramadanmubarak

A post shared by AMPAC (@muslims_of_canada) on

Alhumdullilah,

we are very happy to announce that efforts made by AMPAC and other community members has resulted in the City of Calgary also approving our request for masjids across Calgary to broadcast the Adhaan—the Muslim call to prayer—for the remaining days of Ramadan starting today, May 8, 2020.

This approval is for the sunset or Maghrib prayer only.

The call to prayer does not invite people to physically gather; rather it is a beautiful gesture to bring our hearts together during this time of distancing.

Calgary now joins many mosques in Canada who have recently adopted the practice for the month of Ramadan for the sunset prayer only.

We will be in touch with majids and organizations in Calgary.

AMPAC has been designated as the main liaison between with the City of Calgary and the masjids for any Adhaan related items or updates.

AMPAC extends our deepest appreciation to the @cityofcalgary, City Council members, and most importantly, Mayor @nenshi for approving our request and understanding its importance to our community.

This is a huge milestone and showcases the true beauty of our city, province, and country.

“The sun set Thursday, and a deep, melodious voice began from a loudspeaker at Windsor Mosque.

“God is great,”

Imam Mohamed Al-Jammali sang in Arabic.

It was the athan, the Islamic call to prayer.

The same words have summoned faithful Muslims around the world daily for centuries.

It was beautiful and haunting.

It was over in less than three minutes.

But it stays with you.

It’s only symbolic.

The mosque’s hundreds of members can’t gather there or anywhere because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

But it’s providing much-missed connection during the holy month of Ramadan and comfort during the pandemic.

In a time of anxiety and isolation, it’s a moving example of the power of community and belonging.

Waiving the noise bylaw for a few minutes a night for a few weeks until May 23 to allow the athan is a small act that means a great deal to Windsor’s 25,000 Muslims.

It’s a gift for the rest of us, too.

Most of us have probably never heard it.

We’ve been enriched.

Among the remarkable displays of thoughtfulness and kindness during the pandemic, this is one of the simplest and finest.

So let me tell you a bit about Windsor Mosque.

Among its members are 20 or 30 doctors and many more nurses who work at Windsor Regional Hospital, the designated COVID-19 hospital.

Some used to rush to prayer still in their scrubs.

They work alongside healthcare workers from all religions, risking their health and that of their families to care for all of us during the pandemic.

For a month now, the mosque has been delivering baskets of food and household supplies to seniors and others who can’t go out to shop.

They have a dedicated phone line to call and request a basket.

Anyone can call, regardless of faith.

The mosque has also donated food to frontline workers at both hospitals.

It donates tens of thousands of dollars a year in food to food banks and The Downtown Mission.

It collaborates with all faiths to do this, from Jewish synagogues to Catholic churches.

This pandemic has taught us we must work together.

It has shown us what we can achieve when we do.”

Anna Jarvis, The Windsor Star

MIA iftaar pick up service.

The masjid is the lifeline of the community.

Please be our lifeline www.miaonline.org/lifeline

MIA iftaar pick up service. The masjid is the lifeline of the community. Please be our lifeline www.miaonline.org/lifeline

Posted by Manitoba Islamic Association on Friday, May 8, 2020

 

“Alhumdullilah,

NAMF Canada successfully organized our drive through Iftaar for our neighbours in need during Ramadan 2020.

Our dedicated team distributed 140 iftar meals along with free face masks and hand sanitizers.

Our food bank team also distributed a large amount of groceries to deserving families. …

I want to do something different today.

My intention is to embed as many Friday Talks or Friday Jumah Livestreams on the Third Friday, the Middle Friday, of Ramadan 2020…

A snapshot of what Jumah Looks like in Ramadan 2020 during the Pandemic Lockdown.

Inshallah,

I’ll keep updating this entry new videos as they are found online or tweeted to me : @30Masjids.

 

 

 

#Virtual_Friday_Khutbah_imamAlJammali 7Ramadan and the supplication رمضان والدعاء

Posted by Windsor Islamic Association on Friday, May 8, 2020

 

 

Jummah Lecture Only by Imam Nafis – No Salah

Jummah Lecture Only by Imam Nafis – No Salah

Posted by Jame Masjid Mississauga on Friday, May 8, 2020

 

 

Jumah Reminder w/ Sh.Alaa

Posted by ISNA Canada on Friday, May 8, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over the past ten years of 30 Masjids in 30 Days of Ramadan project,

I would document every Jumah Friday Prayer I attended during Ramadan.

Sometimes by video, often photos, rare time with audio recording only.

In all those years,

I could only attend One Jumah in person each Ramadan week.

The Pandemic Lockdown has changed all that.

Now I can attend many

Many Masjids and regular Friday Prayer Providers have been livestreaming at least something around their regular Friday Prayer start times.

IIT Islamic Institute of Toronto, cancelled Jumah yet began livestreaming Friday Talks.

Islamic Foundation of Toronto livestreams a Friday Reminder.

Sayeda Khadija Centre livestreams a Jumah prayer now conducted inside vast empty Main Prayer Halls with the bare minimum of people present to make the Jumah valid.

Like our cousins in faith, Livestream Jumahs need a Minyan.

Prior to Pandemic Lockdown of Masjids the world over,

Small to Medium sized Masjids would host two or three and sometimes up to five consecutive short Jumah Qhutbahs, Friday Prayer Lectures, to accommodate their overflowing Friday Congregations.

An Unintended Benefit of broadcasting / livestreaming is that every masjid who wants to, need only conduct One Friday Jumah Qhutbah.

That Single Jumah Qhutbah can be Quality instead of Quantity, unrushed and at length.

Everyone’s At Home due to the Pandemic Lockdown, what else are Muslims going to do Mid-Day on a Friday ?

Everyone who wants to watch, can watch from home at the same time.

Or catch their favourite Jumah Khateeb, Friday Lecturer, afterwards on youtube or elsewhere.

Alhamdulillah Hong Kong Masaajid open today! What are many governments of the World doing wrong especially the UK?#COVID-19

Posted by Clearly Abbas on Friday, May 8, 2020

 
Hong Kong Masjids Re-open Today for All Prayers with Conditions – MCHK – Muslim Council of Hong Kong

“During COVID-19 lockdown, Muslims can’t go to the mosque due to large gathering restrictions

Ramadan 2020 is also falling during lockdown

City of Windsor Canada approved the request of Muslims to have call of prayer broadcast on speakers until end of Ramadan

This has really uplifted Muslims spiritually

Here is my experience with hearing Adhan out loud from the speakers of Minaret of Windsor Mosque

Malik Bhai

“I reflect quite often on the fact that I’m mayor of the fourth most diverse community in Canada.

It’s that diversity that helps make us stronger as a community.

I say that so often to different groups, and I really mean it.

When I hear, as mayor, racist comments or when I read some of the things that I’ve read I’m deeply disturbed by that because that does not reflect the broader community that I know in my city.

I think people appreciate that the city responded in this particular way.

And I think because of the situation that we’re in, it was the right thing to do.

We’re not alone doing it – many other cities across the country are doing it.

And I quite proud of that community and all that they’ve offered to help make our city better.”

Mayor Drew Dilkens, City of Windsor

Drive-Thru Iftar Program

Winnipeg Grand Mosque, Manitoba Islamic Association, 2445 Waverley Street

“Just sharing a glimpse of line at the Iftar drive thru program.

Proudly serving the community.

Thank you for partnering with us (MSA, PSA & MIA.)

Thank you to all our vendors: Barbeque Hut, Uppal Spice Delights, City Pizza, Pitza Witza.”

Canada Pakistan Trade & Cultural Association of Manitoba

Just sharing a glimpse of line at the Iftar drive thru program. Proudly serving the community. Thank you for partnering with us (MSA, PSA & MIA.Thank you to all our vendors: Barbeque Hut, Uppal Spice Delights, City Pizza, Pitza Witza.

Posted by Canada Pakistan Trade & Cultural Association of Manitoba on Thursday, May 7, 2020

 

Dan MacDonald spoke with Mirza Baig, President of Windsor Islamic Association, about the Call to Prayer in South Windsor on his AM800 CKLW Radio show.

 

 

Mississauga is right to stand against intolerance

 
By Star Editorial Board

Wed., May 6, 2020

 

City councillors in Mississauga did a good and generous thing last week when they gave permission for local mosques to broadcast the evening call to prayer during the month of Ramadan.

It was a simple yet meaningful gesture at a time when the COVID-19 pandemic makes it impossible for Muslims to gather together physically at their places of worship. “People need comfort and familiarity during this difficult time,” Mayor Bonnie Crombie said by way of explanation.

Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie seen at a Nov. 18 budget committee meeting.

That should have been the end of it. But, as the saying goes, no good deed goes unpunished. For their trouble, councillors were subjected to a barrage of abuse on social media, so much so that they felt they had to revisit the issue on Wednesday.

To their credit, they reaffirmed their decision to allow an exemption to noise bylaws during Ramadan this year. Muslims who aren’t able to go to their mosque can hear the evening call to prayer, or Azan, broadcast through loudspeakers.

It would, of course, have been quite wrong to back down in the face of the complaints, even under the guise of “consulting” further with various parts of the community.

Allowing a temporary exemption from a noise bylaw for a few weeks, for a call to prayer that lasts less than five minutes, is just the decent thing to do at a time when everyone is trying to make the best of a tough time.

Many other cities have done the same thing — Toronto, Hamilton, Brampton, Ottawa and Windsor among them. Halifax and Edmonton, too.

In Europe, Germany and the Netherlands have also allowed amplified prayers during Ramadan to ease the pain of Muslims denied permission to get together in person at a time when family and community gatherings are most important.

The good news is that this has been, for the most part and in most places, quite uncontroversial. In Toronto, city staff simply decided on their own to make an exemption from noise bylaws until the end of Ramadan on May 24.

Nor should it be controversial. Church bells can be heard every Sunday, and anyone complaining about those would rightly be considered an intolerant crank. And everyone, of every religious persuasion or none at all, must put up with weeks of Christmas music everywhere they turn from Halloween to the end of year.

Yet somehow, for some people, the prospect of hearing the sunset call to prayer from a mosque is apparently intolerable. An open letter circulating online called hearing the Muslim call to prayer a “violation of human rights” and even suggested it might trigger PTSD in veterans who fought in Afghanistan or Iraq. It garnered thousands of signatures in support.

In Brampton, the chair of a school council, Ravi Hooda by name, used the occasion to tweet insulting comments about Muslims (for that Peel Region School Board booted him from his position). And a column in the Toronto Sun sounded an alarm about “Sharia-Bolsheviks” who want to “change our society permanently.”

It’s worth noting, though, that this loud and intolerant minority is far from the complete picture. The Interfaith Council of Peel, a group of religious leaders ranging from Buddhists to Unitarians, supported Mississauga’s decision with these words: “Rather than thinking of this simple action as divisive or favouring one group over another, may it be a reminder that members of our community are deeply missing each other.”

That’s about the size of it. Allowing a temporary exemption to a noise bylaw, at what all agree is a time of unprecedented challenges, threatens no one and takes away nothing from any community.

If we are truly, as the current slogan goes, “all in this together,” we can start by abandoning needless suspicion and doing what we can to make life a little better for our fellow citizens — of whatever background.

 

First Public Athan at the First Second Mosque in Toronto

Witness the first public Azaan in the first Second Masjid of Toronto.

Municipalities across Canada have recently allowed for the public broadcast of Athan at Maghrib time during the month of Ramadan.

Many of us are accustomed to going to the mosque during Ramadan, however this year, with the pandemic, it is not possible.

So hearing the athan being broadcast acts as a source of comfort for Muslims.

 

Sister Sara Mill commented on youtube . . .

“This video is amazing MashaAllah,

I have been comming to this mosque ever since I was born and today I’m 17 years old!

The amazing community, the memories, get togethers, diversity is everything.

It’s really unfortunate that we cannot congregate at the mosque like we normally do,

but InshaAllah we shall reunite again soon.

Never thought I would see the day when the mosque would close their doors but this video brings back amazing memories,

Thank you Isna for making this!

Shoutout to Jami mosque OG, y’all know who you are!!!!!

❤️❤️❤️❤️

Don’t recognize one person in this video except Sheikh Hamdi,

I think next time a video is done it should be with people who actually regularly attend the mosque!

Thanks for also including the neighbors,

May Allah bless all of you!

 

Dundas Street Mosque at 3047 Dundas Street West was Toronto’s “First” Masjid.

 

Day 1 – Mosque One – The Forgotten Dundas Street Mosque

 

That building was sold with proceeds from the sale put towards purchase of 56 Boustead Avenue, a former Presbyterian Church, by Muslim Society of Toronto.

 

Day 1 – Jami Mosque

 

Jami Mosque is Toronto’s Second Masjid.

Jami Mosque is Toronto’s Oldest Masjid still in continuous uninterrupted operation.